Workplace design for the modern employee can be complex…

 

…and how an office space is designed can greatly influence staff productivity, wellbeing and motivation.

The Modern Office

 

For most people, the workplace is their second home. It’s where the majority of the week and one third of our lives is spent, so it’s unsurprising that employees have come to expect more than a desk and chair from their everyday workplace experience.

Workplace design has become a major USP for people-centric employers as they strive to recruit and retain their industry’s most talented individuals and unlock significant productivity gains. Standout offices regularly make national news, with companies like Google, Lego and Airbnb garnering widespread attention for their creative designs including napping pods, state-of-the-art gyms and play areas that wouldn’t look out of place in a nursery.

However, despite the novelty of on-site slides, complementary cafes, picnic areas and game zones, what do employees really want from a work environment and how far does the ideal workplace transcend beyond the office’s four walls?

Comfort is key

 

People perform at their best when they are comfortable.  This knowledge is already being acted upon as the design of UK workspaces mirrors popular non-working environments, such as cafes, lounges and kitchen table settings.

Instead of taking a one-size-fits-all approach, organisations are also creating new spaces that cater to different working styles in order to strike a balance between effective and efficient working. It is, in effect, recognising the increasingly personalised experience that today’s technologies offer. By offering a blend of different spaces, workers are given the opportunity to pick an area that matches their mood or the type of project they’re working on. Brainstorms and team catch-ups are best over a coffee in more relaxed and creative settings, but for detailed work and quiet study a more private and calm space is required. Empowering people to move around the office and work in a way that suits them – as opposed to feeling tied to their desks – breeds trust, productivity and creativity; three values that are integral to business success.

A 2017 report by JLL – Workplace, Powered by Human Experience – revealed that the average business uses 48% of its space for dedicated workplace seats, with the other 52% set aside for alternative working areas. Not so long ago, the majority of offices’ breakout spaces would have been a kitchen area or meeting room rather than a dedicated and carefully curated space – a clear demonstration of the modern workplace undergoing significant change for the better.

 

Flex appeal

Workplace design is evolving and in today’s fast-paced digital society, these changes are driven by the adoption of new technologies. Just as our homes are becoming more tech-enabled, so too is the workplace.  Now that employees are adept at using smartphones, tablets and other intuitive and collaborative technologies on a day-to-day basis, they expect workplace solutions that are equally user-friendly and are shunning traditional enterprise-led software in place of more familiar programmes such as FaceTime, Dropbox and even WhatsApp.

Employers that embrace this consumerisation of the workplace express a willingness for employees to work flexibly, which will be met with heightened efficiency and an all-round more engaged workforce. Research by YouGov has revealed that 89% of British employees consider flexible working to be a key motivator to their productivity, so the ability to tap into work remotely, from any location and at any time of day without compromising efficiency is an attractive prospect for the modern worker.

But where does increased workplace mobility leave the future of office design and how can employers create a working environment that people want to spend time in?

A key consideration is to support a wide range of devices and how they are used. Increasingly, people favour using portable technologies such as notepads and tablets, so the need to dedicate large amounts of floor space to formal desking and fixed desktops is diminishing dramatically.

A range of meeting rooms with intuitive collaboration and meeting technologies now often has more relevance than formal boardrooms or individual offices and centralised, well-equipped, open areas with comfortable seating and creative design cater for transient workers and those working collaboratively.

Providing a range of working environments is important for staff wellbeing and productivity. Having that choice of how and where to work allows individuals and teams to work according to their mood, style and circumstance. Here is a shot of a rocket shaped meeting pod we installed for Rocketmakers, acting as a central part of their office space encouraging collaboration.

As the boundaries between home and work merge, it becomes even more important to recognise the need for relaxation and sociability too – providing spaces for company culture to thrive and people to come together to forge valuable personal and professional connections.  Whether it’s on-site cafes,  a range of chill-out or tech free zones, areas for lunchtime activities or outdoor spaces for quiet reflection – diversity is an important component of the modern workplace.

Greater personalisation can be expected too as more smart building technologies are rolled out. Not only can these technologies take centralised control of core functions such as heating and lighting to improve environmental sustainability, they can also offer a more bespoke experience for users. Thanks to improved connectivity, Big Data and the Internet of Things, smart building technologies can verify employee identity, allocate parking spaces, provide building entry by recognising a car registration and even assign work settings based on tasks and personal heat, lighting and acoustic preferences.

A strategically designed office that is planned with the modern employee in mind offers an entire workforce — remote or otherwise — the optimum environment to build connections with colleagues, host clients with pride and choose the workplace experience that is right for them. In turn, this improves employee satisfaction and demonstrates a commitment to future proofing the workplace for maximum commercial success.

Has something you’ve read here sparked an interest? Do you want to find out more about how we could help you improve your employee experience through office design? Why not get in touch? For more information about office design have a flick through some of our other insights here.

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Pro-working; an effective solution beyond co-working 


We have all witnessed the emergence and remaining dominance of co-working workplaces globally, but where do we go from there? We touched on co-working in a previous Insight article, and discussed the pros and cons. It was concluded that co-working with a balanced and considered office design is beneficial for businesses who thrive on internal and external collaboration, in particular tech companies.

Co-working is not the be all and end all, and a one-size-fits-all approach cannot work with the multiplicity of small businesses that exist in a diverse range of industries. As a result, unique solutions are occurring that take the principles of co-working, and tailor them to suit a different kind of business. The term Pro-working, or ‘Professional-Working’ addresses some of the issues with co-working, and its emergence is an important addition to how businesses can function.

What is pro-working? 

 

A new set of standards for a unique way of working has materialised, but what is pro-working? Pro-working addresses some of the issues that can occur from co-working. Co-working is set up to house informal startups, with an open and specific focus on collaboration, networking and knowledge sharing. This approach works for many, but the problem occurs when a business also needs privacy, a sense of identity, and a space appropriate for client facing opportunities. Pro-working provides a solution for businesses such as these, enabling occupiers to have everything taken care of, to focus on only the most important aspects of the business. 

Pro-working takes aspects of the hospitality industry and applies them to the working environment, by providing a high-end service including concierges, a dedicated team to look after calls and greet clients, mailing rooms and private meeting spaces. With many business owners now looking for the highest quality space that they can find to attract and retain talent, increase productivity, and ultimately find an ideal space for their business to grow, pro-working is an attractive proposition. To demonstrate this, we look at a real-world example of pro-working in action. 

Taking pro-working to the next level 

Interaction recently designed and built a 13,000 sq ft space in Bath for Clarendon Business Centres that takes pro-working to the next level. Julian Cooper (pictured above), Managing Director of Clarendon Business Centres discusses working with Interaction to create an inspirational pro-working hub:

 

Q: What prompted your decision to bring a pro-working space to Bath, and generally?

 

A: My team and I had been looking for a sizeable and suitable space in Bath for a number of years; somewhere that was central but also large enough to accommodate different sized office spaces, breakout and meeting areas. When we came across Cambridge House, it ticked every box and had the potential for us, with the help of Interaction, to transform it into a luxurious working environment in an area that is a thriving hub for growing businesses. 

 

Q: Why is pro-working an effective solution beyond co-working?

 

A: Co-workers and pro-workers both look to collaborate, network, exchange skills and knowledge share. Pro-working adds value by providing a surrounding that will ensure clients get the best first impression of your working environment, and have no uncertainty about the integrity and competency of your business. Providing an inspirational working environment for businesses will not only attract and retain the best staff but often results in higher morale. With the selection of different sized offices, productivity is higher as you are guaranteed privacy. By elevating these facilities, we’re giving businesses quality foundations to help them grow and continue to be successful. At Clarendon we provide flexible working and offer our clients the flexibility to use us on a daily, weekly or monthly rate basis. 

 

Q: What do you see for the future of pro-working?

A: I certainly see more companies having higher expectations when they look at office space. The UK is the leading global serviced office sector, with the largest and most mature market, accounting for over a third (36%) of the worldwide serviced office footprint. The main contributing factors that have made pro-working as successful as it is comes down to office space that is, in a prime and accessible location, high-quality and stylish interior, friendly and professional front of house staff and a safe and secure working environment with onsite facilities such as showers and breakout areas. 

All office workers expect to have IT facilities and spacious offices, but it is the extra details that raises this to another level, and these factors certainly contribute to the rise and continuing prevalence of pro-working. 

 

Conclusion  

 

Pro-working fills a gap that allows small businesses to thrive in a professional and high-end environment, but it will not be for everyone. This will not be the end of co-working, the two will continue to coexist to serve distinct purposes. Pro-working will become increasingly popular, as this model offers a more professional and corporate environment compared to traditional serviced offices or co-working spaces, and aids in helping small to medium businesses thrive. 

 

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A new year is upon us…

 

…and that means that our designers are getting excited about the workplace design trends that may make an appearance over the next 12 months.

We’ve amalgamated our expertise, designers’ opinions, and wider research to bring you five key themes to watch out for.

Trend 1: Green Offices As Standard

 

Last year saw the upsurge of green workplaces, with key finishing touches including floor plants and moss walls. Moving on to this year, the trend has gone a step further; arguably natural touches (especially ferns and small planters) are now a ‘given’ aspect of workplaces and biophilia in general is second nature when it comes to office design – as necessary as windows or staircases.

Here at Interaction, we’re advocates for this and design biophilia into our workplaces wherever we can. Not only do these additions look great, but they have a positive effect on wellbeing and even productivity.

Biophilia may become the standard in workplace design, not just an optional extra.

Trend 2: Rustic and Natural Finishes

 

Linking up with the ‘green offices as a given’ trend, finishing touches are likely to be inspired by all things natural in 2019. Our designers think scallop and scale shapes will be popular on tiles in tea points and bathrooms, in addition to rustic metal touches on floors and materials, and naturally-inspired jewel shades like emerald and sapphire.

Designer Victoria suggests why these might be popular: “Finishes inspired by nature help to create a calming yet inspiring environment – a combination that is great news for productivity, as well as overall office aesthetics”.

 

Trend 3: The Evolution of the Coworking Space

Coworking, which brings different companies under one roof, has gained popularity rapidly in the last couple of years. 2019 will see a further development: rather than separate entities remaining closed off from one another, we could see dividing walls coming down to allow different businesses to actually share the same space and resources.

Even in more traditional workplaces, brick and mortar walls may be replaced with smaller dividers, such as metal display cabinets or acoustic panels.

Coworking spaces, like the one we created for Runway East, could evolve even further.

Trend 4: A New Lease of Life

 

In the next 12 months, “recycling” could gain a whole new meaning in the world of commercial property; as demand increases for space in busy cities, so will the trend of injecting new life into unique old buildings.

Bringing once dilapidated steel and brick structures and warehouses back to life is a particularly positive move for business parks. A prime example of this, and a project we’re currently working in, is Frome’s new business park, which includes the refurbishment of the well-known 1960s-era Tool and Gauge building.

 

Progress is in full swing at Frome Business Park, due for completion in the Spring.

Trend 5: Experience-driven Spaces

 

Shining an even brighter light on employee wellbeing, the next 12 months could see workplace enhancements aimed at cultivating further community and morale. Examples could include meditation areas, yoga studios, virtual reality zones and active spaces. These features would be aimed at every member of staff, regardless of role and generation.

 

 

Time will tell…

 

Always up to date with the latest design practices, and those that are best for employees and wider businesses, we’re looking forward to putting some of these 2019 workplace design trends into practice when creating even more unique workplaces throughout 2019.

 

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A guide to utilising Enhanced Capital Allowances for your new workspace

 

Our clients want to ensure they provide the most comfortable and effective working environment for their team. We are frequently asked how to provide the best technology available, whilst making it affordable, and this is where the Enhanced Capital Allowance (ECA) scheme comes in.

In this article, we discuss how the Enhanced Capital Allowance scheme is a key tool in creating a cost-effective, and positive working environment. We explore what the ECA scheme is, how to utilise it, and we showcase a prime example.

What is the ECA scheme?

 

The ECA legislation was introduced in 2001 to give generous tax incentives for businesses to invest in energy-saving equipment within workplaces around the country. In order to qualify for these incentives, items of equipment must be included in the Energy Technology List (ETL) and adhere to the guidelines set by The Carbon Trust.

The first year allowances let businesses set 100% of the cost of the assets against taxable profits in a single tax year. This means the company can write off the cost of the new plant or machinery against the business’s taxable profits in the financial year the purchase was made.

An ECA is claimed through a business’s income or corporation tax return in the same way as any other capital allowance. HM Revenue and Customs is responsible for the tax-related aspects of the ECA scheme.

  • Air to air energy recovery
  • Automatic monitoring and targeting (AMT) equipment
  • Boiler equipment
  • Combined heat and power (CHP)
  • Compressed air equipment
  • Heat pumps
  • Heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment
  • High speed hand air dryers
  • Lighting
  • Motors and drives
  • Pipework insulation
  • Refrigeration equipment
  • Solar thermal systems
  • Uninterruptible power supplies
  • Warm air and radiant heaters
  • Waste heat to electricity conversion equipment

What are the benefits of ECA?

 

The benefits of ECAs are immediately striking – 100% of the cost of the assets in the ETL list can be set again taxable profits, if you compare this to the typical writing down allowances of 8% or 18%, the difference is staggering. For most other capital expenditure, tax relief is typically spread over 20 or more years.

We often recommend specific technologies that are on the ETL list that we know can be highly beneficial in creating the ideal working environment. For example, The Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) HVAC System, a highly efficient air conditioning system, that operates quietly and allows the user with full control over the temperature of their environment. We frequently recommend LED lighting systems to clients, the return on investment can be quick, and benefit the well-being and productivity of employees. LED lighting is glare-free, less tiring on eyes, and can be adjustable to suit personal preference, to create an effective and comfortable working environment.

We often find that clients are understandably more susceptible to looking at investing in the lowest cost equipment for their new workplace. However, although this may appear to be the cheapest option, these immediate cost savings in the long run are generally not the most cost effective. We look at the longer-term perspective and life cycle cost of cheaper equipment, in order to enhance the additional cash flow benefits.

Not only do ECAs have cash flow benefits, but they can also improve your building’s BREEAM (Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method) rating and EPC rating, which can enhance and support environmental policies. In the long run, the maintenance costs of this energy-efficient technology can often save you money, along with significantly lower running costs.

Further Explanation

 

We enlisted the help of one of the leading independent firms of Chartered Accountant and Business Advisors in the South West, Milsted Langdon, to help us explain:

“We have worked with many clients and their project managers when refurbishing or relocating their office to maximise tax relief available from the ECA. These have ranged from small scale projects focusing on the replacement of a single existing asset, to large scale refurbishment projects for those clients who are moving premises, refurbishing existing buildings or undertaking significant capital expenditure. Understanding the available tax reliefs has helped clients make crucial investment decisions.

One of the reasons ECA is so crucial to talk about, is because it’s often just not on a company’s radar. To illustrate the relief available, if a company spends £50,000 on qualifying ECA expenditure and pays corporation tax at 19%, the total corporation tax saving in year 1 is £9,500, making the effective cost of the technology £40,500.

This contrasts with a qualifying spend of £50,000 where there is no available allowance to offset the expenditure. In year 1, the total corporation tax saving is £760, with continuing relief being given on a 8% reducing balance over the life of the asset for an integral feature such as a lighting system.”

An example of ECA – money.co.uk

 

Mike Borne, Project Manager at Interaction, explains how we worked with money.co.uk to utilise the scheme, and have a fundamentally positive impact upon their office refurbishment:

“The Castle project for money.co.uk was a brilliant example of how the government’s ECA scheme can benefit building owners, employers and employees. Incorporating highly efficient state of the art mechanical and electrical systems into a building can be a costly affair. The ECA scheme allows businesses to invest in the latest technology while writing off the cost against taxable profits, providing a cash flow boost as an incentive to invest. money.co.uk were able to take full advantage of this while simultaneously providing a far more comfortable working environment to their employees, which played a key role in their recruitment drive upon project completion. On top of this, the building owner has benefited from an M&E system which is designed to keep the two century year old castle in a good state of repair. This is all possible because ECA increases the affordability of this latest tech.”

 

Notably, utilising the ECA scheme can have significant positive benefits upon the cash flow of your business, and the costs of your new workspace. Furthermore, investing in advanced technologies aids in creating an environment that allows people to work effectively.

Speak to us today to find out more.

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With it set to gain further traction this year, we take a closer look at this developing trend and why it will be beneficial for your workplace.

A place where staff members want to come to work

 

The Resimercial design trend encompasses layouts, architecture and furniture that blend residential and domestic interiors with more traditional workplace aspects. It revolves around the liberalisation of workplace design, which puts people and their work-life balance at the centre.

By creating comfortable environments, the workplace becomes a place where staff members want to come to work in, rather than a place they have to be – which in turn, enhances productivity. This productivity underpins the trend; by working in a more comfortable space, individuals are inspired to be more creative and collaborative – factors which greatly enhance the output of work.

It’s also evidential of employers valuing their staff, as Helen Booker of Frövi (who specialise in furniture for social spaces, some of which can be seen in Wild & Wolf’s new cafe area below) discusses: “Resimercial emulates the balance between work and home. By mimicking the atmosphere of the home environment and café culture, employers show they understand that their staff have a life outside of the office, and they’re prepared to compromise for them. That’s a powerful plus-point for an employer.”

 

The Resimercial trend in action

 

Interaction designer Hayley Whitlock shines further light on the development of the trend, commenting how: “Resimercial design has grown in tandem with collaborative and agile spaces. The more workspace design has moved in that direction, the more we have seen the Resimercial trend. Every design and build project we work on is based around creating agile, collaborative and flexible working spaces that bring out the best in people – and Resimercial now plays a significant role in this too.

“A great example where we have used Resimercial recently was in our project for SunLife. The reputable insurance company wanted to enhance their working culture with a modern, collaborative and wow-factor space. A key part of achieving this came from utilising the Resimercial trend and combining spaces for working and downtime, in addition to one-of-a-kind finishing touches, such as a central tree. The breakout areas give a particular nod to Resimercial, by offering the comfort of home in a workplace setting, with varied styles of seating, lighting and décor. The overall result is a flexible environment suitable for today’s modern work force – and one that will encourage collaboration, creative thinking and productivity.”

 

 

 

We’re excited to see what the future of Resimercial holds – the design team here are looking forward to using it more and more…

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Providing an insight into a workplace design trend that’s bringing people together: the community table.

 

Collaboration and community – two words that we are hearing more and more when workplaces are discussed, their perceived importance is evidently increasing. Cue the community table, a design element that can encourage and support both of these aspects.

What is a community table?

 

The name may give you a hint, but if you haven’t caught on it’s a table that has no one owner or user, that can be used by anyone and everyone. The community table can be used for a variety of purposes and people can invent their own uses for it.

 

How do you use yours?

 

Bringing people together to eat, chat and meet is invariably important. The community table is useful to encourage people to step away from their desks and spend quality time with colleagues. It’s also a great area for an adaptable working space to give you flexibility in the way you work, and even somewhere to play board games or ping pong!

 

Showcasing our community table 

 

Everyday we find a new use for our table, we use it to create space plans, mood boards, organisational charts, gather for team meetings and much more. Have a look at our 50 second video to see it in action! 

We often use it to gather around for our fortnightly ‘Interaction Time’ meetings where we talk about what we’ve been up to; from projects to social events. For us the community table is a purposeful representation of community, emphasising the fact we’re a team, reinforcing the collegial and collaborative approach that we take here at Interaction.  

 

Where does this trend come from? And how is it going to influence office design?  

 

This concept is not a new phenomenon, you can see this type of design in restaurants such as Wagamama. A canteen-esque style that has been commonly adopted in this industry. The community table is also commonplace in modern kitchens in homes, kitchens are often known as the hub of a house, in which families gather together. 

The community table is a facet of the flexible working design trend, as we’ve past wholly open offices and enclosed, private offices, we now look to more flexible workspaces with a balance of both. Acknowledging that people are different, and people work in different ways depending on the task. Therefore giving people the choice to work however they want to, on their own, collaboratively, standing up, with music etc., is important. Design trends such as the community table allow people to do just this. 

 

 

No place like home 

 

This trend goes hand in hand with many other modern design trends, such as the rise in breakout areas – creating spaces that are more relaxed and more like home. Companies are now realising the impact that workplaces can have on business, and as creativity and wellbeing become of increasing value, these kind of trends will become more and more common. 

 

Does it work?  

 

Depends. You can’t just insert a large community table in the middle of an office and expect to suddenly have a collaborative workspace. The degree to how successful it is, depends on the culture of your business. If this sounds like it would fit into your already established culture, then there’s no reason why it wouldn’t work. Furniture or design is not enough to create a culture, that has to come from the bottom up and be engrained in the business’ values.  

 

Do you encourage clients to implement this design feature?  

 

Absolutely. If we feel like they have the right culture, or are in the process of creating that culture, then it is always something we suggest as we’ve seen first hand how useful it can be.  

 

A recent example 

 

A recent example can be seen at Sift Digital. At their tea point and breakout area we designed a long table that is used regularly for informal meetings, group lunches, social gatherings and solitary/group work.  

 

Overall…  

 

This can be a great way to bring people together, provide with more flexible working space and much more. It’s a design feature that’s not regularly talked about when office design is discussed, but it’s benefits are boundless. 

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Meetings just got more exciting; we provide an insight into the meeting room revolution 

 

Meetings – we all have them, whether you love them or loathe them, they are an integral part of communicating and collaborating with colleagues. In this article we will explore why the traditional meeting room is failing us and how it is being revolutionised.

As we know, the workplace is changing, design is always evolving, the function of the office is broadening, the generations of the workforce are shifting, and this all brings about new trends in office design.

At Interaction, we design and build inspirational workspaces and we have been championing a new way of meeting – a setting that gives people flexibility and choice for effortless collaboration and efficiency. We believe the workplace is a tool to support wellbeing, foster collaboration and integration to encourage creativity and productivity; meeting spaces are a crucial part of this and embody these values.

 

Why the traditional meeting room is failing us

 

There is a significant amount of research to suggest traditional meeting spaces are ineffective. In the 2016 Leesman Index, a research project comparing the physical environments of average and high performing workplaces, shows the importance of flexible meeting spaces. It was found that one of the top workplace features that high performing offices utilise more than average offices were informal and unplanned meeting spaces. Along with the profound statistics that 30% of scheduled meetings worldwide are no-shows, 73% of people do other work during meetings, and it is estimated that 25-50% of time in meetings is wasted; clearly traditional meetings are not working.

The issue with the traditional meeting room is it’s intransigent and regimented nature, which means overly planned meetings, and uninviting space are not encouraging for spontaneous collaborations. We are not saying that the traditional meeting room is redundant, however a space has to have more. But what is more? And what can we do to tackle this issue?

The Revolution Begins

 

To create an environment that is effective for everyone, you have to go beyond rigid cellular meeting rooms. Moving towards spaces with no singular use, that can be utilised for an impromptu meeting, a whole company gathering, a setting to socialise, eat, collaborate, brainstorm and so on. The flexibility of these spaces is where their value lies, in the transitional period of Millennials entering today’s workforce. These meeting environments correspond with the needs and desires of this generation.

The idea of flexible meeting spaces is congruent with the deterioration of the open-plan office, which we have touched on previously. At the heart of the open plan proposition was ultimately to foster collaboration and interaction, to allow your workplace not to be restrained by physical boundaries. However, there has been and always will be problems with this ideology, as people work in different ways. But has the move away from open-plan offices correlated with the revolution of the meeting spaces?

Dieter Wood, Managing Director at Interaction discusses:

“We are moving away from completely open plan offices that maximise the provision of workstations. Proficient space planning strikes a balance and incorporates functional components to allow people to step away from their desk and have accessibility to a multitude of settings to suit the varying demands of their work. Additionally, introducing these spaces that are used for private work as well as meetings, create opportunity for hot-desking, meaning less dedicated desks are needed. We have been helping clients think differently about meeting spaces, and the results have been prominent, these settings are quickly becoming pivotal in aiding their people to work more effectively.”

A few meeting spaces we’ve revolutionised 

 

Hydrock’s Tiered Seating

At the heart of Hydrock’s Bristol office that Interaction recently refurbished is the tiered seating auditorium. This unique feature creates a cardinal point in the space to encourage people to socialise, gather and learn. The auditorium is frequently used for team meetings, training and spontaneous collaborations. More pictures and information about this project will be available very soon.

 

Interaction’s Community Table 

The Community Table that is placed at in the centre of the breakout area is the most versatile space in the Interaction office, as shown in our video. The functions of this table are significantly variable, and can host a whole company meeting, a one-on-one chat, brainstorms for our designs, or even ping pong. The usefulness of this table is pretty simple, it’s completely malleable and so big that you can almost always use part of it for a use that you desire.

 

money.co.uk’s Ice Cave

The ‘Ice Cave’ is just one example of the multitude of flexible spaces that are scattered around the Castle that Interaction transformed. The Ice Cave, is a truly effective and secluded room that can be used for the team at money.co.uk to eat, relax, chat or have an informal meeting. To see more of money.co.uk’s ultimate workplace click here.

 

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